Immunization schedule

Childhood immunization schedule Birth Vaccine: Hepatitis B 2 months of age Vaccine DTaP - Diphtheria, Tetanus, Acellular Pertussis IVP - Inactivated Polio vaccine Hepatitis B Pneumococcal vaccine HIB - Haemophilus influenza Type B Rotavirus vaccine 4 months of age Vaccine DTaP IVP Pneumococcal vaccine HIB Rotavirus vaccine 6 months of age Vaccine DTaP IVP Hepatitis B Pneumococcal vaccine HIB Influenza vaccine** Rotavirus vaccine 12 months of age Vaccine MMR - Measles, Mumps, Rubella Pneumococcal vaccine Hepatitis A 15 months of age Vaccine DTaP HIB Varicella 18 months of age Vaccine Hepatitis A 4 to 6 years of age Vaccine DTaP MMR IVP Varicella 11 years of age to adult Vaccine Tdap Meningococcal vaccine HPV (human papilloma vaccine) *Certain vaccines can be given within a range of ages. This chart represents one recommended schedule. Your child's pediatrician may follow different guidelines. Please consult with your child's pediatrician for specific recommendations. **The influenza vaccine is given annually. The initial dose can be given as early as 6 months of age. Hepatitis B Three doses of the hepatitis B vaccine are generally given – the first dose is usually given within 12 hours of birth, the second at about 2 months, and the third at about 6 months of age. Slight variations in this schedule are possible based on the mother’s hepatitis B surface antigen status and the potential use of combination vaccines. Your pediatrician will discuss these issues with you. Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis Five doses of the diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis combination vaccine are given, with the first dose usually given at 2 months of age, the second at 4 months, the third at 6 months, the fourth at about 15 months of age, and the fifth at about 5 years of age. Slight variations in this schedule are possible. Your pediatrician will discuss these issues with you. Inactivated Polio Four doses of the inactivated polio vaccine are given, with the first dose given at 2 months, the second at 4 months, the third at about 6 months, and the fourth at about 5 years of age. Pediarix Pediarix is a combination vaccine that can help protect against five serious diseases: diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), hepatitis B, and polio. Pediarix is typically given at 2, 4, and 6 months of age. Haemophilus influenzae Type b Four doses of the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine are given. The first at 2 months, the second at 4 months, the third at 6 months, and the fourth at about 12 months of age. Slight variations in this schedule are possible. Your pediatrician will discuss these issues with you. RotaTeq RotaTeq is a vaccine that can help protect against rotavirus, which is a viral infection that can cause fever, vomiting, and diarrhea. The vaccine is given by mouth at three different times, each about one to two months apart. Measles, Mumps, Rubella Two doses of the measles, mumps, and rubella combination vaccine are given, with the first dose given at about 12 months of age and the second given at about 5 years of age. Varicella Two doses of the varicella (chickenpox) vaccine are usually given at about 12 months of age and at 4 to 6 years of age. Pneumococcal Vaccine Four doses of the pneumococcal vaccine are usually given. The first is given at 2 months of age, the second at 4 months, the third at 6 months, and the fourth at about 12 months of age. Hepatitis A The hepatitis A vaccine is given to protect against one type of hepatitis, hepatitis A. Hepatitis is a type of liver disease. The vaccine is typically given as a two-dose series, with the first shot given at the age of 1 and the second around 6 months later. Menactra Menactra is a vaccine given to protect against meningococcal disease, which is a serious bacterial infection that can cause meningitis—severe swelling of the brain and spinal cord. It can also lead to sepsis—a dangerous and potentially life-threatening blood infection. Gardasil Gardasil is a vaccine given to help protect against diseases caused by certain types of human papillomavirus. These diseases include: Cervical cancer (cancer of the lower end of the uterus or womb) Abnormal and precancerous cervical lesions, vaginal lesions, vulvar lesions Anal, penile cancer Genital warts Head/neck cancer The Gardasil vaccine is given in three doses, ideally as: First dose: at a date you and your health care professional choose Second dose: 2 months after the first dose Third dose: 6 months after the first dose

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Do you know what is the Immunization Schedule followed in our country? @Abhishek Kumar Siddharth
Yes sir Will update with Indian one too
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Helpful post
Thank you doctor
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