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Hemorrhagic stroke

A craniotomy for an intracerebral hemorrhage (hemorrhagic stroke)!! Take a close look at this mega huge blood clot taken out piece by piece from the parenchyma of the brain! Intracerebral haemorrhage is an accumulation of blood that occurs within the brain tissue or ventricles. It can be epidural if there is blood between the skull and the dura mater, subdural if between the dura mater and the arachnoid, subarachnoid if between arachnoid and the brain, or finally, intracerebral if intra-parenchymal. Intraparenchymal cerebral haemorrhage can be further distinguished by the lobar location (frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital) or intraventricular (if there is a collection of blood in the cerebral ventricles). Intracerebral hemorrhage is a type of bleed occurs when blood suddenly bursts into or within brain tissue, usually from hypertensive vasculopathy resulting in the rupture of small, penetrating arteries, causing extensive damage. The size may vary from punctate to catastrophically large, with associated mass effect and midline shift. Hypertensive angiopathy stiffens vessel walls and makes them fragile, eventually to swell and bulge. The formation of aneurysms as a result of the chronic hypertension is the reason they may rupture and bleed within the lobes or the deep brain structures. It typically present with sudden focal neurologic deficit that gradually worsen over minutes to hours. The blood clot is surrounded by a zone of compressed ischemic tissue. Vascular leakage, in this zone, causes cerebral edema, which increases over a few days. Thus, the hemorrhage causes focal neurological deficits and, more important, increased intracranial pressure. Causes include brain trauma, aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, and brain tumors. The largest risk factors for spontaneous bleeding are high blood pressure and amyloidosis. Diagnosis is typically made by CT scan. Other conditions that may present similarly include ischemic stroke.

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Congratulations! Your case has been selected as Case of the day and you have been awarded 5 points for sharing the case. Keep posting your interesting cases, Happy Curofying!

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nowadays...we do this with endoscooe and mini craniotomy or trephine

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Nice educational post

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Agreeable text.

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thanks Doctor

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Impressive

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Good n tq

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