A Rare case of Cervical fibroid in a postmenopausal woman

Share your views on this rare case of Cervical Uterine fibroid by Dr. Viraj R Naik Learn to handle such rare gynecology cases through his rich experience Follow us for more such updates!

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A Rare case of cervical fibroid in a post menopausal woman- presented by Dr Viraj R.Naik in Experts Insights clinical case is an informative work Although cervical fibroids are rare after menopause , Some risk factors can increase your chance of developing fibroids.during menopause They include: high blood pressure (hypertension) low vitamin D levels a family history of fibroids obesity no history of pregnancy long-term, extreme stress Thanks

Bp ok ho jatta h cervical ok ho jatti h ok
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Key learning point for me was position of fibroid seen on post surface of cervix which is rare and confusing with uterine masses or uterine inversion Yes any prolapse or mass seen per vagina in post menopausal age pt should never be overlooked and should be subjected to through examination and investigations as in this case probe pressure test could differentiate Yes timely wise approach could avoid many benign tumors going malignant

Thanx dr Viraj R Naik
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RARE. CASE. OF CERVICAL. - UTERINE. FIBROID IN. A. POST MENOPAUSAL WOMAN.... .. NICELY. DIAGNOSED..... MANAGED. AND. DISCUSSED. .... ... ACCORDING. TO USA. FIBROID. CENTRES.... ... RESEARCHES. SHOW. A. LINK. BETWEEN. HORMONES. AND. FIBROIDS..... TAKING. BIRTH. CONTROL. PILLS. ..WHEN. A. WOMAN. ALREADY. HAS. FIBROIDS..... CAN. CAUSE. MORE. FIBROID. GROWTHS.. IF. THERE. ARE. NO. FIBROIDS. PRESENT.... THEN. THERE. IS. LESSER. RISK. OF. FIBROIDS. GROWTH... IF. THE. FEMALE. IS. TAKING. BIRTH CONTROL. PILLS. OF. LESSER. DOSES. OF. OESTROGEN... .. THANKS. A. LOT. SIR ...

Nicely discussed by my colleagues And rare case that gives me a sufficient knowledge to recollect My subject once again. Thanks one and all specially Dr Vijay R Naik for this informative and educative update .

Thanks Dr Viraj R Naik
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Congratulations! Your case has been selected as Case of the day and you have been awarded 5 points for sharing the case. Keep posting your interesting cases, Happy Curofying!

Thanks Dr Viraj R.Naik .for your case presentation .. You have done fantastic sergical procedure and Way of approach is appreciated. Now a days one of the burning problem being faced by women and need more expert hands and experience.

NICE ILLUSTRATION WE DO GET FIBRIOD WHICH CAN BE KIND OF UTERINE OR CERVICAL THEY CAN BE SOLITARY OR MULTIPLE

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Thanks Dr @Viraj R. Naik for posting such a nice & rare case to refresh our knowledge on O&G.

Cervical Fibroids after menopause:-Fibroids need the hormone estrogen to grow. After menopause, a woman’s estrogen levels decrease dramatically, which usually reduces the risk of developing fibroids. In many cases, fibroids actually shrink and cause fewer symptoms for women who have reached menopause. Women who are taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) during perimenopause or after menopause may not see a decrease in their symptoms. This is because HRT usually contains a combination of estrogen and progesterone, which are the same hormones that allow fibroids to grow in younger women. Symptoms Treatment Outlook Fibroids are tumors or growths that develop in the muscles of the uterus. They are also called leiomyomas or myomas. these growths are very common and can affect up to 50 percent of women at some point in their life. Fibroids affect mostly women in their 30s and 40s and tend to affect African-American women more frequently. These growths are almost always noncancerous. A woman may have just one or more fibroids at one time, and they can range in size from very small to very large. Fibroids after menopause The risk of developing fibroids decreases after the menopause, but they can still occur. Fibroids need the hormone estrogen to grow. After menopause, a woman’s estrogen levels decrease dramatically, which usually reduces the risk of developing fibroids. In many cases, fibroids actually shrink and cause fewer symptoms for women who have reached menopause. Women who are taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) during perimenopause or after menopause may not see a decrease in their symptoms. This is because HRT usually contains a combination of estrogen and progesterone, which are the same hormones that allow fibroids to grow in younger women. Symptoms The symptoms of fibroids remain the same regardless of a woman’s age when they occur. Symptoms include: enlarged abdomen anemia fatigue pain during sex pain in the back of the legs pelvic pain or pressure pressure on the bladder or bowels low back pain Some women do not experience symptoms and may not even know that they have fibroids unless a finds them during a routine visit. Other women have very severe symptoms, which may leave them unable to go to work or carry out routine activities. Treatments for fibroids range from a “watch and wait” approach for women who do not have symptoms to complete removal of the uterus (hysterectomy) in women with severe symptoms. You will consider many factors when deciding on a treatment plan. Some of these factors include: size of the fibroids location of the fibroids a woman’s age the symptoms that she is experiencing Unless she is experiencing symptoms, a woman does not usually need treatment for fibroids after menopause unless they are very large. “Watch and wait” Many women choose to not have treatment for their fibroids because of their tendency to shrink or go away after menopause. However, it is still important to check in with the regularly to see if they have grown. Medication If the fibroids are causing symptoms, may recommend medications. These include: Pain medicine: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen, can help relieve some of the symptoms and pain associated with fibroids. Iron supplements: Women with heavy menstrual bleeding may benefit from taking an iron supplement, especially when they have their period. Iron can help prevent anemia caused by excess blood loss. Birth control pills: Low-dose birth control pills and some progesterone-only contraceptives can help to control heavy bleeding. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa): The most common drug in this class is called Lupron. These GnRHa drugs can help shrink fibroids and make them easier to remove if surgery is possible. However, Lupron may cause severe side effects and is linked to bone loss, so most will only prescribe it for less than 6 months. Advice:- consult gynecologist

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