Medial epicondylitis

Definition Medial epicondylitis is commonly known as golfer’s elbow. This does not mean that only golfers have this condition. But the golf swing is a common cause of medial epicondylitis. Many other repetitive activities can also lead to golfer’s elbow: throwing, chopping wood with an ax, running a chain saw, and using many types of hand tools. Any activities that stress the same forearm muscles can cause symptoms of golfer’s elbow. Chief Complaints The injury can occur from using poor form or overdoing certain sports, such as: Golf Baseball and other throwing sports, such as football and javelin Racquet sports, such as tennis Weight training Repeated twisting of the wrist (such as when using a screwdriver) can lead to golfer’s elbow. People in certain jobs may be more likely to develop it, such as: Painters Plumbers Construction workers Cooks Assembly-line workers Computer users Butchers Signs and Symptoms Symptoms of medial epicondylitis may develop slowly, particularly when the condition has been brought on by overuse. Other people may develop symptoms suddenly, especially in the event of injury. Symptoms associated with medial epicondylitis may be mild or severe. Some include: Pain when flexing the wrist toward the forearm Pain that extends from the inside of the elbow through the wrist to the pinky A weak grip Pain when shaking hands Difficulty moving the elbow A tingling sensation extending from the elbow to the ring and pinky fingers A stiff elbow A weakened wrist Complications of Medial Epicondylitis In addition, medial epicondylitis may also be associated with other problems, such as ulnar nerve neuropathy. A compression of this nerve, also known as the cubital tunnel syndrome, which is located just after the medial epicondyle. It usually tingles the fingers, especially between the fourth and fifth fingers. In more severe cases it can cause loss of strength in the region. The disease can also be associated with medial instability of the elbow. It tends to occur mainly in those who practice sports activities frequently, such as throwing, which requires repetitive valgus movement and can cause injuries to the medial ligaments of the athlete’s elbow. Sometimes, medial epicondylitis can result in a complication. It is the involvement of the ulnar nerve because the proximity to it is great. This nerve is precisely the one that causes us a sensation of shock when we hit the elbow on an object or piece of furniture. The patient who had medial epicondylitis if he presents frequent tingling in the hand, especially in the ring and little fingers, possibly has a problem with the ulnar nerve. In this case, new physical exams must be done to assess the need for surgery where a tendon debridement (cleaning) and nerve decompression are performed. Diagnosis Diagnosis of Medial Epicondylitis You will be asked about your symptoms, medical history, recent physical activity, and how the injury occurred. You may not remember the event that caused the injury because golfer’s elbow pain develops over time. The doctor will examine your elbow for: Pain on the inner side of the elbow when: Doing certain arm motions Pressing on the medial epicondyle Stiffness of elbow and pain with wrist movement X-rays are not usually necessary. However, an x-ray may be needed if the doctor suspects other problems. An MRI scan is occasionally used for diagnosis, but there is only limited evidence supporting this use. THERAPY 1- Rest 2- ice the affected area 3-use a brace 4-stretch and strengthen the affected area 5-gradually return to you're usual activities EXERCISES 1- ball squeeze 2-finger extension 3- wrist extension 4- forearm probation and supination Prevention of Medial Epicondylitis You can take steps to prevent golfer’s elbow: Strengthen your forearm muscles. Use light weights or squeeze a tennis ball. Even simple exercises can help your muscles absorb the energy of sudden physical stress. Stretch before your activity. Walk or jog for a few minutes to warm up your muscles. Then do gentle stretches before you begin your game. Fix your form. Whatever your sport, ask an instructor to check your form to avoid overload on muscles. Use the right equipment. If you’re using older golfing irons, consider upgrading to lighter graphite clubs. If you play tennis, make sure your racket fits you. A racket with a small grip or a heavy head may increase the risk of elbow problems. Lift properly. When lifting anything — including free weights — keep your wrist rigid and stable to reduce the force to your elbow. Know when to rest. Try not to overuse your elbow. At the first sign of elbow pain, take a break HOMEOPATHIC TREATMENT Rhus tox, calcarea carb,cocculus indicus Kali carb ,Ruta,Belli's perennis,carbo animalis,Kali nitricum

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