WHAT IS THE PROGNOSTIC VALUE OF D dimer 8500 IN A PATIENT WITH COVID 19?

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D-dimer is a fibrin degradation product present in the blood after a blood clot is degraded by fibrinolysis.  Therefore, Raised D dimer is an indirect indicator of clotting on our body, the more is the clotting, the higher is level of D dimer Covid 19 is associated with clotting. Severe Covid 19 is associated with increased clotting Thus D dimer is indirect indicator of severity of Covid 19 In this case D dimer is very high, which indicate severe Covid 19 which can be associated with variety of complications Relatives need to be informed accordingly

Valuable opinion
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No single investigation have independent prognostic value. If you take clinical as well as other biomarkers that would be give better prediction. Isolated D-Dimer value (quantitative) have no obvious prognostic value.

Valuable opinion
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In simple language d dimer shows " the dissolving -- fibrinolysis process of clot or thrombus. Increasing level of d dimer suggests still clots r there and going on fibrinolysis.

IT'S A .. FIBRIN DEGRADATION PRODUCTS .. FDP .. IT'S VALVE RELATED TO.. CLOT .. THROMBUS .. IN THE BLOOD..

YES. SIR ...D - DIMER. LEVELS. .ON. ADMISSION.... CAN. HELP. IN. PREDICTING. ... ... ..PROGNOSIS. AND. SURVIVAL. RATE. IN. COVID 19. PATIENTS..... ......EVEN. IF. THEY. ARE. VERY. SERIOUS. IN. EMERGENCY.... . .. GENERALLY. ACCEPTED. D - DIMER. LEVELS. ARE.... .. 1. EQUAL. OR. LESS. THAN.... ..…………… .2 . O... BETTER. SURVIVAL. PREDICTABILITY...... EVEN. IN. SEVERE. COVID. 19. INFECTION 2. MORE. THAN... ...2 . O... INCREASED. MORTALITY. RATE.. 3....MORE. THAN. .. ....3 .5.... ... NO / LEAST. SURVIVAL. .. PREDICTION

D-dimer on admission greater than 2.0 µg/mL (fourfold increase) could effectively predict in-hospital mortality in patients with Covid-19, which indicated D-dimer could be an early and helpful marker to improve management of Covid-19 patients.

It depends on on the care of patient

I don't think so sir
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A normal D-Dimer is considered less than 0.50. A positive D-Dimer is 0.50 or greater. Since this is a screening test, a positive D-Dimer is a positive screen. There is not necessarily a critical level for a D-Dimer. D-dimer is one of the protein fragments produced when a blood clot gets dissolved in the body. It is normally undetectable or detectable at a very low level unless the body is forming and breaking down blood clots. Then, its level in the blood can significantly rise. This test detects D-dimer in the blood. When a blood vessel or tissue is injured and begins to bleed, a process called hemostasis is initiated by the body to create a blood clot to limit and eventually stop the bleeding. This process produces threads of a protein called fibrin, which crosslink together to form a fibrin net. That net, together with platelets, helps hold the forming blood clot in place at the site of the injury until it heals. Once the area has had time to heal and the clot is no longer needed, the body uses an enzyme called plasmin to break the clot (thrombus) into small pieces so that it can be removed. The fragments of the disintegrating fibrin in the clot are called fibrin degradation products (FDP), which consist of variously sized pieces of crosslinked fibrin. One of the final fibrin degradation products produced is D-dimer, which can be measured in a blood sample when present. The level of D-dimer in the blood can significantly rise when there is significant formation and breakdown of fibrin clots in the body. For a person who is at low or intermediate risk for blood clotting (thrombosis) and/or thrombotic embolism, the strength of the D-dimer test is that it can be used in a hospital emergency room setting to determine the likelihood of a clot's presence. A negative D-dimer test (D-dimer level is below a predetermined cut-off threshold) indicates that it is highly unlikely that a thrombus is present. However, a positive D-dimer test cannot predict whether or not a clot is present. It indicates that further diagnostic procedures are required (e.g., ultrasound, CT angiography). There are several factors and conditions associated with inappropriate blood clot formation. One of the most common is deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which involves clot formation in veins deep within the body, most frequently in the lower legs. These clots may grow very large and block blood flow in the legs, causing swelling, pain, and tissue damage. It is possible for a piece of the clot to break off and travel to other parts of the body. This "embolus" can lodge in the lungs, causing a pulmonary embolus or embolism (PE). Pulmonary embolisms from DVT affect. While clots most commonly form in the veins of the legs, they may also form in other areas as well. Measurements of D-dimer can be used to help detect clots in any of these sites. For example, clots in coronary arteries are the cause of myocardial infarction (heart attacks). Clots may form on the lining of the heart or its valves, particularly when the heart is beating irregularly (atrial fibrillation) or when the valves are damaged. Clots can also form in large arteries as a result of narrowing and damage from atherosclerosis. Pieces of such clots may break off and cause an embolus that blocks an artery in another organ, such as the brain (causing a stroke) or the kidneys. Measurements of D-dimer may also be ordered, along with other tests, to help diagnose disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). DIC is a condition in which clotting factors are activated and then used up throughout the body. This creates numerous tiny blood clots and at the same time leaves the affected person vulnerable to excessive bleeding. It is a complex, sometimes life-threatening condition that can arise from a variety of situations, including some surgical procedures, sepsis, poisonous snake bites, liver disease, and after childbirth. Steps are taken to support the affected person while the underlying condition resolves. The D-dimer level will typically be very elevated in DIC. Treatment:-Elevated levels of D-dimer, a marker of procoagulant state, have been identified as a marker of an increased risk of recurrent VTE. Statins have proven antithrombotic properties, as suggested by the reduction of several prothrombotic markers, including D-dimer, in patients at high risk of arterial thrombosis. Such antithrombotic properties could also be observed in patients at high risk of venous thrombosis. Aim of the study is to assess the effect of statins on D-dimer levels in patients with previous VTE after oral anticoagulant treatment withdrawal.Patients with a single episode of idiopathic VTE (either DVT or pulmonary embolism) who received at least 6 months of adequate treatment with oral anticoagulants, for whom treatment withdrawal is planned, and with LDL cholesterol levels of equal to or greater than 130 mg/dL will be randomized to either atorvastatin, 40 mg, 1 tablet daily and lipid lowering diet or lipid lowering diet for 3 months. On the day of oral anticoagulant treatment withdrawal (Day 0), enrolled patients will undergo measurement of plasma D-dimer. At 30 days ± 3 (Day 30), patients will undergo measurement of D-dimer, CK, LDH, ALAT e ASAT and clinical evaluation. At 90 days ± 7 (Day 90), patients will undergo measurement of D-dimer, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides ed clinical evaluation