cervical spondylitis CSM

-A male patient age about 31 years old - A case of CSM -A C/O severe neck pain left upper limb numbness hamiprasis since last week 4/2/2021 - H/O CAD - H/O lifestyle poor diets hardworking Not know HTN DM COPD IBS TB epilepsy -No C/O fever. Cold. Cough -No Costipetion O/E Patient Counsicsess Dullness PR:90 TM BP:110/70 mmhg Temp: normal Spo2 :99% Motor sensory aphasia 3/4 GCS:E.4 V5. M6

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रोगी वात व्याधि से ग्रस्त है। चिकित्सा संबंधी योग,,, महानारायण महामासादि तेल को मिलाकर गर्दन पर मालिश करें और फिर उस पर एरंड का पत्ता रख कर पट्टी बांध दें। यह कार्य लगातार रोजना एक माह तक करें। महायोगराज गुगल स्वर्ण युक्त 2 वटी एकांग वीर रस 2 रत्ती शहद में मिलाकर सुबह-शाम सेवन कराएं। महारास्नादि क्वाथ 25 ग्राम सुबह-शाम खाने के बाद दें। योग परिक्षित है। पिछले 40 वर्ष से प्रयोग कर रहा हूं।

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? CERVICAL SPINE ARTHROPATHY.. ? CERVICAL SPINE SPONDYLITIS.. NEED'S.. ETEROCOXIB 90MG OD.. TOPICALLY ..DICLOFENAC GEL.. PHYSIOTHERAPY..

According the reports and symptoms neck traction is essential. So collar band is suggested Vrahat vaat chintamani ras 50mg +rasraj ras 50mg+vrahat vatgajankush100mg+akangveer 100mg+ agnitundi vati 200mg /b.d. Maha rasnadi quath 20ml b.d after meal Vaat har tel for local applications and baluka swed

अग्नितुंडी vati can provide some relief but not complete therefore issues are neglected in India its hard to be cure by this combo.
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Aconitum napelus, Belladonna, Cimicifuga racemosa, Conium maculatum, Gelsemium sperviorens, Guajacum officinale, Hypericum perforatum, Jagallan cinerea and Ras toxicodendrum

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Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is a neck condition that arises when the spinal cord becomes compressed—or squeezed—due to the wear-and-tear changes that occur in the spine as we age. The condition commonly occurs in patients over the age of 50. Because the spinal cord carries nerve impulses to many regions in the body, patients with CSM can experience a wide variety of symptoms. Weakness and numbness in the hands and arms, loss of balance and coordination, and neck pain can all result when the normal flow of nerve impulses through the spinal cord is interrupted. Anatomy Your spine is made up of 2 bones, called vertebrae, that are stacked on top of one another. The seven small vertebrae that begin at the base of the skull and form the neck comprise the cervical spine. Other parts of your spine include: Spinal cord and nerves. The spinal cord extends from the skull to your lower back and travels through the middle part of each stacked vertebra, called the central canal. Nerves branch out from the spinal cord through openings in the vertebrae (foramen) and carry messages between the brain and muscles. Intervertebral disks. In between your vertebrae are flexible intervertebral disks. They act as shock absorbers when you walk or run. Intervertebral disks are flat and round and about a half inch thick. They are made up of two components: Annulus fibrosus. This is the tough, flexible outer ring of the disk. Nucleus pulposus. This is the soft, jelly-like center of the disk. Symptoms Typically, the symptoms of CSM develop slowly and progress steadily over several years. In some patients, however, the condition may worsen more rapidly. Patients with CSM may experience a combination of the following symptoms: Tingling or numbness in the arms, fingers, or hands Weakness in the muscles of the arms, shoulders, or hands. You may have trouble grasping and holding on to items. Imbalance and other coordination problems. You may have trouble walking or you may fall down. With myelopathy, there is no sensation of spinning, or "vertigo." Rather, your head and eyes feel steady, but your body feels unable to follow through with what you are trying to do. Loss of fine motor skills. You may have difficulty with handwriting, buttoning your clothes, picking up coins, or feeding yourself. Pain or stiffness in the neck    DISEASES & CONDITIONS Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy (Spinal Cord Compression) Please be aware that, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many hospitals and health systems are asking patients to delay their elective orthopaedic procedures. For more information: What to Do If Your Orthopaedic Surgery Is Postponed. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is a neck condition that arises when the spinal cord becomes compressed—or squeezed—due to the wear-and-tear changes that occur in the spine as we age. The condition commonly occurs in patients over the age of 50. Because the spinal cord carries nerve impulses to many regions in the body, patients with CSM can experience a wide variety of symptoms. Weakness and numbness in the hands and arms, loss of balance and coordination, and neck pain can all result when the normal flow of nerve impulses through the spinal cord is interrupted. Anatomy Your spine is made up of 24 bones, called vertebrae, that are stacked on top of one another. The seven small vertebrae that begin at the base of the skull and form the neck comprise the cervical spine.  Cervical spondylotic myelopathy occurs in the cervical spine—the seven small vertebrae that form the neck Other parts of your spine include: Spinal cord and nerves. The spinal cord extends from the skull to your lower back and travels through the middle part of each stacked vertebra, called the central canal. Nerves branch out from the spinal cord through openings in the vertebrae (foramen) and carry messages between the brain and muscles.  Spinal nerve root. Intervertebral disks. In between your vertebrae are flexible intervertebral disks. They act as shock absorbers when you walk or run. Intervertebral disks are flat and round and about a half inch thick. They are made up of two components: Annulus fibrosus. This is the tough, flexible outer ring of the disk. Nucleus pulposus. This is the soft, jelly-like center of the disk. Cause Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) arises from degenerative changes that occur in the spine as we age. These degenerative changes in the disks are often called arthritis or spondylosis. Cervical Disk Degeneration Bone spurs. As the disks in the spine age, they lose height and begin to bulge. They also lose water content, begin to dry out, and become stiffer. This problem causes settling, or collapse, of the disk spaces and loss of disk space height. As the disks lose height, the vertebrae move closer together. The body responds to the collapsed disk by forming more bone—called bone spurs—around the disk to strengthen it. These bone spurs contribute to the stiffening of the spine. They may also make the spinal canal narrow—compressing or squeezing the spinal cord.  (Left) Side view of a healthy cervical vertebra and disk. (Right) A disk that has degenerated and collapsed. Herniated disk. A disk herniates when its jelly-like center (nucleus pulposus) pushes against its outer ring (annulus fibrosus). If the disk is very worn or injured, the nucleus may squeeze all the way through. When a herniated disk bulges out toward the spinal canal, it can put pressure on the spinal cord or nerve roots. As disks deteriorate with age, they become more prone to herniation. A herniated disk often occurs with lifting, pulling, bending, or twisting movements.  Herniated disk (cross-section and side views) Other Causes of Myelopathy Myelopathy can arise from other conditions that cause spinal cord compression, as well. Although these conditions are not related to disk degeneration, they may result in the same symptoms as CSM. Rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease. This means that the immune system attacks its own tissues. In rheumatoid arthritis, immune cells attack the synovium, the thin membrane that lines the joints. As the synovium swells, it may lead to pain and stiffness and, in severe cases, destruction of the facet joints in the cervical spine. When this occurs, the upper vertebra may slide forward on top of the lower vertebra, reducing the amount of space available for the spinal cord. Injury. An injury to the neck—such as from a car accident, sports, or a fall—may also lead to myelopathy. For example, a "rear end" car collision may result in hyperextension, a backward motion of the neck beyond its normal limits, or hyperflexion, a forward motion of the neck beyond its normal limits. Because these types of injuries often affect the muscles and ligaments that support the vertebrae, they may lead to spinal cord compression. Related Media DISEASES & CONDITIONS  Anatomy of the Spine Video DISEASES & CONDITIONS  Herniated Disk Animation Video Symptoms Typically, the symptoms of CSM develop slowly and progress steadily over several years. In some patients, however, the condition may worsen more rapidly. Patients with CSM may experience a combination of the following symptoms: Tingling or numbness in the arms, fingers, or hands Weakness in the muscles of the arms, shoulders, or hands. You may have trouble grasping and holding on to items. Imbalance and other coordination problems. You may have trouble walking or you may fall down. With myelopathy, there is no sensation of spinning, or "vertigo." Rather, your head and eyes feel steady, but your body feels unable to follow through with what you are trying to do. Loss of fine motor skills. You may have difficulty with handwriting, buttoning your clothes, picking up coins, or feeding yourself. Pain or stiffness in the neck To Top Related Articles TREATMENT Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: Surgical Treatment Options TREATMENT Spinal Injections Doctor Examination   Treatment Nonsurgical Treatment In milder cases, initial treatment for CSM may be nonsurgical. The goal of nonsurgical treatment is to decrease pain and improve the patient's ability to perform daily activities. Nonsurgical treatment options include: Soft cervical collar. This is a padded ring that wraps around the neck and is held in place with velcro. Your doctor may advise you to wear a soft cervical collar to allow the muscles of the neck to rest and limit neck motion. A soft collar should only be worn for a short period of time since long-term wear may decrease the strength of the muscles in your neck. Physical therapy. Specific exercises can help relieve pain, strengthen neck muscles, and increase flexibility. Physical therapy can also help you maintain strength and endurance so that you are better able to perform your daily activities. In some cases, traction can be used to gently stretch the joints and muscles of the neck. Medications. In some cases, medications can help improve your symptoms. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs). Drugs like aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen can help relieve pain from reduce inflammation. Oral corticosteroids. A short course of oral corticosteroids may help relieve pain by reducing inflammation. Epidural steroid injection. Although not often used to treat CSM, in this procedure, steroids are injected into the space next to the covering of the spinal cord (the "epidural" space) to help reduce local inflammation. Although a steroid injection may temporarily help relieve pain and swelling, it will not relieve pressure on the spinal cord. Narcotics. These medications are reserve for patients with severe pain that is not relieved by other options. Narcotics are usually prescribed for a limited time only. Although people sometimes turn to chiropractic manipulation for neck and back pain, manipulation should never be used for spinal cord compression. Surgical Treatment If nonsurgical treatment does not relieve your symptoms, your doctor will talk with you about whether you would benefit from surgery. The majority of patients with symptoms and tests consistent with CSM are recommended to have surgery. There are several procedures that can be performed to help relieve pressure on the spinal cord. The procedure your doctor recommends will depend on many factors, including what symptoms you are experiencing and the levels of the spinal cord that are involved.

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Cervical spondylitis. Analgesics antiinflamatory and locally. Physiotherapy.

Rx Constitutional remedy with PQRS

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Rhustox30 &Ruta,G.30.

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Rhus Tox 200 weekly × 4 dose

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Rx- Bellies per

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