Concluded Case

PYOGENIC GRANULOMA

Recently diagnosed and treated case of "PYOGENIC GRANULOMA" in upper anterior teeth region in 19 years male also called as 'eruptive hemangioma'-an exophytic reactive fibrovascular growth. Case: Soft,mobile,pedunculated,reddish growth measuring 4.5 mm w.r.t 11 & 21 bleeds profusely on probing, mildly tender present since 8 months causing esthetic problems. Pre-operative IOPA & topographic occlusal showing " slight cupping "of underlying alveolar bone. Excised specimen and histopathology report suggestive of fibro vascular tissue with parakeratanized epithelium, neo-vascularization with no dysplasia changes. Follow-up after 15 days along with Post operative picture showed with complete healing. IOPA showing reduction in cupping defect of alveolar bone w.r.t 11 21. Thank You.

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Nice case erudite presentation @Dr. Saloni Arora . Pyogenic granuloma is a nonneoplastic lesion of the oral cavity, is thought to occur as a reactive fibrovascular tissue-reaction to local irritation or trauma. Clinically, PG generally occurs as a solitary exophytic growth that can be sessile or pedunculated with a smooth or lobulated surface. PG can occur following minor trauma but also occurs spontaneously. The etiology of PG is unclear; it is considered a reactive tumor-like lesion arising by various stimuli, such as chronic low-grade irritation, traumatic injury, hormone effect, or drug-induced reaction. Bleeding and ulceration are common complications bone loss and diastema are usually associated with long standing lesion. Surgical excision is a successful treatment of choice in minimizing the recurrence of lesion. Meticulous management of the lesion should be performed while preserving the mucogingival complex.
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Nice case erudite presentation @Dr. Saloni Arora . Pyogenic granuloma is a nonneoplastic lesion of the oral cavity, is thought to occur as a reactive fibrovascular tissue-reaction to local irritation or trauma. Clinically, PG generally occurs as a solitary exophytic growth that can be sessile or pedunculated with a smooth or lobulated surface. PG can occur following minor trauma but also occurs spontaneously. The etiology of PG is unclear; it is considered a reactive tumor-like lesion arising by various stimuli, such as chronic low-grade irritation, traumatic injury, hormone effect, or drug-induced reaction. Bleeding and ulceration are common complications bone loss and diastema are usually associated with long standing lesion. Surgical excision is a successful treatment of choice in minimizing the recurrence of lesion. Meticulous management of the lesion should be performed while preserving the mucogingival complex.
Splendid,,, very nicely explained @Dr. Kausar Yadwad . Much appreciated.
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@Dr. Saloni Arora Nyc case... Wanted to ask Acc to u wat Cud b the etiology associated was there any trauma asso or it ws spontaneous as mostly it is found in females due to hormonal imbalance ??
Yes @Dr. Haritma Nigam mam, because of trauma the underlying fibrovascular connective tissue becomes hyperplastic and there is proliferation of granulation tissue which leads to the formation of a pyogenic granuloma.
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Very well explanation of this case and hpe report. Good case @ @Dr. Saloni Arora Regards.
Thanks @Dr. Ashish Tiwari :)
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VERY USEFUL UPDATE NICELY ILLUSTRATED... THANKS.. DR...
Examplary work
Thank you @Dr. Vipin Bihari Jain Sir. Regards
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Worthful case
Thanks @Dr. P Kartheek Reddy Sir.
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