SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF SKIN

SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF SKIN Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is a common form of skin cancer that develops in the squamous cells that make up the middle and outer layers of the skin. Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is usually not life-threatening, though it can be aggressive. Untreated, squamous cell carcinoma of the skin can grow large or spread to other parts of your body, causing serious complications SYMPTOMS : Signs and symptoms of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin include: A firm, red nodule A flat sore with a scaly crust A new sore or raised area on an old scar or ulcer A rough, scaly patch on your lip that may evolve to an open sore A red sore or rough patch inside your mouth A red, raised patch or wartlike sore on or in the anus or on your genitals CAUSES : Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin occurs when the flat, thin squamous cells in the middle and outer layers of your skin develop changes (mutations) in their DNA. A cell's DNA contains the instructions that tell a cell what to do. The mutations tell the squamous cells to grow out of control and to continue living when normal cells would die. Most of the DNA mutations in skin cells are caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation found in sunlight and in commercial tanning lamps and tanning beds. COMPLICATIONS : Untreated squamous cell carcinoma of the skin can destroy nearby healthy tissue, spread to the lymph nodes or other organs, and may be fatal, although this is uncommon. The risk of aggressive squamous cell carcinoma of the skin may be increased in cases where the cancer: Is particularly large or deep Involves the mucous membranes, such as the lips Occurs in a person with a weakened immune system, such as someone who takes anti-rejection medications after an organ transplant or someone who has chronic leukemia DIAGNOSIS : Tests and procedures used to diagnose squamous cell carcinoma of the skin include: >Physical exam: Your doctor will ask questions about your health history and examine your skin to look for signs of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. >Removing a sample of tissue for testing: To confirm a squamous cell carcinoma of the skin diagnosis, your doctor will use a tool to cut away some or all of the suspicious skin lesion (biopsy). What type of skin biopsy you undergo depends on your particular situation. The tissue is sent to a laboratory for examination. TREATMENT : Most squamous cell carcinomas of the skin can be completely removed with relatively minor surgery or occasionally with a medicine applied to the skin. Which treatments are best for you depends on the size, location and aggressiveness of the tumor, as well as your own preferences. Treatments for very small skin cancers: >Curettage and electrodessication >Laser therapy >Freezing >Photodynamic therapy Treatments for larger skin cancers: >Simple excision >Mohs surgery >Radiation Therapy

3 Likes

LikeAnswersShare

An important and educative, thank you Ma'am.

welcome sir

Cases that would interest you